The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media)

Search Results
Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) book. Happy reading The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) Pocket Guide.

Basically, we Pretty awesome breath on US history, race relations and the politics of black-white race relations with the White House as the backdrop.

Reward Yourself

Minor note: I couldn't help but notice several editorial problems. A more careful copyediting eye would save the author a slight bit of embarrassment.

  • Ideological Bigotry.
  • Why Use School Information Software?:Keys to Making Sense of K-12 Software;
  • Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment - Two Dollar Radio Headquarters.
  • A Doctors Odyssey.
  • Related Products!
  • 5 Steps to Conquering the LSAT’s Reading Comprehension Section.
  • An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter.

Aug 25, Valerie rated it liked it Shelves: read-in I had the pleasure of hearing Clarence Lusane speak about his book at a work seminar last year. As the author writes, this book features "the stories of real people who have challenged the racist dimensions of U. For too many years, their experiences have been ignored, their voices silenced, their history absent from the public classroom.

The Black History of the White House

Lusane does an excel I had the pleasure of hearing Clarence Lusane speak about his book at a work seminar last year. Lusane does an excellent job of bringing these stories to light. A different story serves as a prelude to each chapter. My favorite story was about Oney Judge, a slave owned by George Washington, who escaped from right under his nose. These were fascinating anecdotes that I'd never heard before.

However, the book, at times, is a bit tedious to read. I'm afraid the author tried to put too much into it. It's not well organized and the timeline is all over the place. I often found it difficult to keep track of what place in history I was reading about. My other main gripe is that Mr. Lusane often inserts his judgment and opinion into the narrative rather than just presenting the facts. I didn't mind this when I saw him speak because his comments served more as an aside and helped personalize his talk, but in the book, it seemed out of place.

It shows the author's bias and cheapens his credibility a bit. Still, I definitely recommend that everyone pick up this book and at least read each chapter prelude.

Works under MDS 975.3

I think these are important stories that everyone needs to hear. Sep 03, Barbara Lovejoy rated it it was amazing. I learned so much! I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to know more about the influence of African Americans on our U. It will open your eyes. Dec 27, Sonny Finch rated it liked it. Lusane explains the birth of slavery in the new world and how the founding fathers individually dealt with it. He objectively accesses Washington and his contemporaries noting the context of their life and times but not hesitating to criticize them.

Lusane pairs his chronological examination of the executive branch with interstitial stories of great black Americans that interacted with the white house as servants, guests, and political leaders. Lusane most notably analyzes the rocky road to Lincoln's evolution into the president who would abolish slavery. Lusane makes notes of comments Lincoln made that show Lincolns reluctance to attack slavery head-on and Lincoln's opinions of his black contemporaries.

Lusane's writing makes me very proud of fellow Americans such as Harriet Tubman and Fredrick Douglas. I liked the first half better than the second half.

  • Together Again ~ Twin Souls Reunite in Love and Life.
  • The Black History of the White House : Clarence Lusane : ;
  • Progress in Public Management in the Middle East and North Africa: Case Studies on Policy Reform (ECONOMIE)?
  • SearchWorks Catalog.
  • A Perfect Day for Digging!

The second half, especially the last chapter, was about black White House cabinet members and people who ran for President. The last chapter is focused on Obama and as it was published in did not seem as relevant today in Not that it was bad, it's just that I can read a lot of this in other books. I liked the story of Oney Judge and I there is a book on my wish list about her that I am going to have to move up in priority. Jun 03, Jenn rated it it was amazing.

Non fiction for Black History Month. Sep 13, Tiffany rated it it was amazing. Such a great history lesson about the white House and the slaves who worked there and were invited as guests.

The Black History of the White House (Open Media) (Paperback)

Jun 29, Tim rated it really liked it Shelves: african-studies. Lusane does an excellent job at structuring individual stories within a larger sociopolitical context. In that sense, many of the narratives and details particularly concerning the stories surrounding the slaves of the "Founding Fathers" were new to me. However, much of the more recent history - as well as its presentation - will not be new to many who are likely to gravitate to a book like this This is a book that would coincide well with Howard Zinn's A People's History of The United States. However, much of the more recent history - as well as its presentation - will not be new to many who are likely to gravitate to a book like this.

Lusane writes from a progressive - not radical - perspective, and names specific problems that minorities and race conscious individuals are well aware of in the age of Obama.

Sign up to stay informed

I had the pleasure of hearing Clarence Lusane speak about his book at a work seminar last year. By Clarence Lusane. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. I enjoyed the specific stories the most. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

This is perhaps the book's main weakness. Readers of this kind of material will be familiar with those problems.

WATCH LIVE: President Trump takes part in a Black History Month event at the White House

This is not to take anything away from the author's achievement in keeping the dialogue alive. Yet the question for intellectuals of all races is how to move from the continued naming of the problem to prescriptive pragmatic solutions in an increasingly complex racial climate.

Get this edition

The Black History of the White House presents the untold history, racial politics, and shifting significance of the White House as experienced by African. The Black History of the White House (City Lights Open Media) [Clarence Lusane ] on gifitoune.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. “Clarence Lusane is.

Discussion seems to be more taboo not less in a country that Lusane has correctly identified as wishing itself "colorblind". View 1 comment. Mar 07, Emily rated it it was ok. I was excited to read this but in the end, I found it disappointing. I enjoyed the specific stories the most. The general history was nothing new, and I did not care for the instances where the author interjected blatant opinion which I felt was out of place for this novel.

At times, I also felt as though it was specifically geared towards an African American audience which I also felt was unnecessary and took away from the power of his narrative. Overall, my biggest issue was that the title and I was excited to read this but in the end, I found it disappointing. Overall, my biggest issue was that the title and general set-up implied an unbiased, factual historical portrayal which is not what was consistently delivered.

Nov 20, Socraticgadfly rated it liked it. OK, to almost good overall, but nowhere near great. It's definitely informative on the factual side, with me learning several new details of black history, though none of them was earth-shattering. There's two main drawbacks. One, this book at times approaches conservative stereotypes of what "revisionist history" is.

Biggest example? The author doesn't even mention Truman's desegregation of the armed forces. Se OK, to almost good overall, but nowhere near great. Second, the book isn't always that "coherent. Jun 16, Nikhil P. Freeman rated it really liked it Recommends it for: history buffs, political scientists, founding father groupies. Shelves: worldview-total-recall , politics-and-bullshit , race-ism-and-class-ism , africana , melting-pot-liquor.

Covers every known American of African ancestry connected in a vital way to the house of the president now commonly known as the White House--and also the People's House. Starting with Oney Judge--look her up and give one of "founding fathers" a serious side-eye--and ending with Barack Hussein Obama--United States of America's first bi-racial, and openly Black, president. View 2 comments.

Feb 08, Michael Jak rated it liked it. Despite very poor editing and sometimes rambling aimless narrative that seems to stray quite a bit from the original thesis, still a very interesting read. HIstorically enlightening about 19th Century president's and their relationship to black Americans. Shows how far we've come, but how far we have to go.

Jan 14, Melissa Reine rated it it was ok.